A New Horizon

Lynes Home Inspections - Tuesday, May 07, 2013

In 2001 we introduced The Lynes QuikReport Home Inspection system; the Lowcountry’s first digital inspection service with online booking and report delivery. Now, we set a new standard all over again.

As the leader in introducing new technology to the market, Lynes announces we are using the Horizon inspection system developed by Carson Dunlop, one of the largest independent inspection companies in North America. The horizon system is another great step in assuring our clients the most advanced, clear, concise and complete inspection services. We have selected this remarkable new software because it is a step above anything else.

The Horizon is the most innovative systems of its kind in use today. The key benefit to our clients is the  bright, clean and exciting report format that is vibrant and easy to navigate, delivered as an online pdf, downloadable to your hard drive so it’s completely green with no wasted paper.

In the hands of our experienced inspectors, the Horizon system provides a clear description of the features and issues and, behind every page of the report is More Information pages in the form of easy to read articles with and descriptive diagrams from the extensive Carson Dunlop home resource knowledgebase.

An added benefit of the Horizon report from Lynes Home Inspections, three fact-filled reports that included with every report - the Home Reference Guide is packed full of information about how your home works, the Home Set up and Maintenance report is filled with useful information to help maintain your home and the Life Cycles and Costs report is an extensive listing of the average lifespan of equipment and features found in the home and the averaged costs for repairs, remodeling and renovations. All three reports are included FREE.

Our Real Estate partners will appreciate the time-saving benefits of the excusive AgentBook app – Schedule your client’s property inspection in as few as two clicks from your I-phone or Android device.

At Lynes Home Inspections we are passionate about protecting home buyers and sellers and Horizon is one way we continue to provide the most in-depth and comprehensive property inspection services in the Lowcountry.


Do you have a question about your house? Send us your questions by visiting our CONTACT page. We'll send a answer by email and your question could end up as a feature in our blog!

REALTORS are encouraged to participate!


Stucco Siding (part 2)

Lynes Home Inspections - Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Today we continue our conversation about cement stucco and EIFS, also referred to as synthetic stucco. As with all siding, moisture is the enemy and the number one culprit of failure is poor craftsmanship therefore it’s important that you are aware of some of the hot spots in stucco – where things can go wrong.

Typically in all stucco houses we like to see visible caulk joints around all windows and doors; anywhere the stucco meets a non-stucco surface such as the window trim. A proper caulk joint will keep moisture from penetrating behind the stucco.

Specific to cement stucco siding we like to see expansion joints above and below all windows or every 100 to 144 square feet of stucco siding.  Cracking in stucco is not necessarily unusual however some types of cracks could indicate swelling inside the wall structure and could very well indicate a problem. Also, anytime anything is attached to the outside of the stucco such as electrical boxes, flag holders or hose reels, those areas need to be properly sealed to keep moisture out of the screw holes that were drilled to install the item.

There are a variety of different ways to inspection stucco both cement stucco and synthetic stucco including visual inspections, moisture probe inspections and even thermal imaging.

So if you own a home with stucco or if you plan to buy one it’s probably important that you ask an expert.

Do you have a question about your house? Send us your questions by visiting our CONTACT page. We'll send a answer by email and your question could end up as a feature in our blog!

REALTORS are encouraged to participate!


Stucco Siding - The Basics

Lynes Home Inspections - Saturday, September 01, 2012

In the Beaufort County market there are basically two types of exterior siding materials that are often referred to as stucco, although one is not stucco at all. The first is what we call real, hard-coat, traditional or cement stucco which is, in effect, about an inch of concrete on the side of the house. The other type is referred to as synthetic stucco and is also referred to by the acronym EIFS which stands for Exterior Insulation Finish System which is, in effect about a inch of Styrofoam attached to the exterior of the house, thereby the insulating quality, which is then covered by a stucco-like material giving it the appearance of hard-coat or real stucco.

Each type of stucco has its own unique properties and each has its own potential problems. We’re gonna talk about that in our next edition of Ask The Experts.


Do you have a question about your house? Send us your questions by visiting our CONTACT page. We'll send a answer by email and your question could end up as a feature in our blog!

REALTORS are encouraged to participate!

Polybutylene Pipe - What's the Big Deal?

Lynes Home Inspections - Thursday, June 07, 2012

Polybutylene plumbing supply pipe - the “wonder product of the 1980’s” has left many homeowners, home buyers and Realtors scratching their heads and in some cases, emptying their wallets. Is there such a thing as good Poly and bad Poly? The answer is both yes and no...

Polybutylene was one of those wonder products that were going to make our lives better; unfortunately it didn't work out that way. Used in this market between 1983 and 1997, Polybutylene plumbing pipe has a number of problems; in the earlier years of use - between 1982 3 and 1988 - plastic fittings were used to connect the sections of pipe together. These fittings were very brittle and failed dramatically. The later use of copper fittings after 1988 reduced the rate of system failure just as dramatically however, by then it was already too late. When the dust had settled on the law suits resulting from system failures, culminating in a class action suit against Shell Oil, the manufacturer of the polymer from which several manufacturers made the pipe, the writing was on the wall and the fate of Polybutylene was sealed.

So here’s the short answer on the good or bad Polybutylene question; houses plumbed with Polybutylene  using plastic fittings – BAD – total plumbing system replacement is the only acceptable resolution. Polybutylene plumbing systems where copper fittings were used is significantly more reliable however be aware – the class action suit lost by Shell centered on the polymer’s reaction to oxidants such as chlorine which is used in the local municipal water system therefore, at some point the Polybutylene pipe will likely break down from the inside and fail. When? Anyone’s guess.

Do you have a question about your house? Send us your questions by visiting our CONTACT page. We'll send a answer by email and your question could end up as a feature in our blog!
REALTORS are encouraged to participate!

Welcome to Our Blog!

Lynes Home Inspections - Wednesday, February 22, 2012

Welcome to our blog!

Feel free to grab a cup of tea and a cookie, put your feet up and take a look around. You'll find heaps of great content and information about Lynes Home Inspections, and there's plenty of goodies.

We will post ideas, comments and videos in our Ask The Experts video series regarding the home inspection process.

We hope you enjoy and feel free to let us know what you think!

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